Pim 29 thai dating


The language is designed for the quickest possible client-side processing consistent with its primary purpose as an electronic publishing and data interchange format." [971208 W3C press release] "XML documents are made up of storage units called entities, which contain either parsed or unparsed data. Its goal is to enable generic SGML to be served, received, and processed on the Web in the way that is now possible with HTML. Announced at the SGML/XML '97 Conference in Washington, D. See the press release, or a press release, alternate source.Parsed data is made up of characters, some of which form the character data in the document, and some of which form markup. XML has been designed for ease of implementation and for interoperability with both SGML and HTML." Sources: [see W3C for additional translations] [December 08 [12], 1997] Extensible Markup Language (XML) 1.0, issued as a W3C Proposed Recommendation. Editors: Tim Bray (Textuality and Netscape), Jean Paoli (Microsoft), and C. Sperberg-Mc Queen (University of Illinois at Chicago). XML WG Chair Jon Bosak clarified the WG's new work focus in light of the publication of this PR.

Several introductory and tutorial articles on the Extensible Markup Language (XML) are referenced in the shorter XML Introduction document. "The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is the universal format for structured documents and data on the Web." -- W3C XML Web site, 2000-07-06.

The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is descriptively identified in the XML 1.0 W3C Recommendation as "an extremely simple dialect [or 'subset'] of SGML" the goal of which "is to enable generic SGML to be served, received, and processed on the Web in the way that is now possible with HTML," for which reason "XML has been designed for ease of implementation, and for interoperability with both SGML and HTML." Note that the "HTML" referenced in the preceding sentence (bis) means HTML 4.0 and 3.2 which were in common use as of 10-February-1998, when the XML 1.0 specification was published as a W3C Recommendation.

A software module called an XML processor is used to read XML documents and provide access to their content and structure. Edited by Tim Bray (Textuality and Netscape), Jean Paoli (Microsoft), C. Sperberg-Mc Queen (University of Illinois at Chicago and Text Encoding Initiative), and Eve Maler (Sun Microsystems, Inc. The XML applications and announced industry initiatives listed below have not been evaluated according to any serious criteria for quality and genuineness.

It is assumed that an XML processor is doing its work on behalf of another module, called the application. is the principal document governing the XML standard. Since the various specifications documents for XML/XLink/XSL are still in some flux, it would often be unfair or difficult to make such a judgment.

"Web Collections are an application of XML - a meta-data syntax that fits easily within the framework of the World Wide Web.